Friday, September 19, 2008

Women's Biographies


Gladys Knight, Between Each Line of Pain and Glory: My Life Story. This immensely inspiring autobiography tells the whole, true story of Gladys Knight, a four-time Grammy winner, whose life has been rich in music, faith, love, and immense hardships. Clicking on the title above will also call up several CDs featuring music by Gladys Knight and the Pips.



Kathleen Turner, Send Yourself Roses: Thoughts on My Life, Love, and Leading Roles. Kathleen Turner has always lived her life according to her own rules. The screen icon opens up about her own life--both personal and professional--the risks she's taken, and the lessons she's learned from her film and stage career, 20-year marriage (and recent separation), raising her daughter, and her successful struggle with rheumatoid arthritis. Turner recounts why she took the roles she did--from her film debut as the sultry schemer in Body Heat to her subsequent craft-stretching roles in Peggy Sue Got Married (for which she received an Academy award nomination), Romancing the Stone, Prizzi's Honor, The War of the Roses, and Serial Mom. And she discusses her recent resurgence on the stage with Tony nominations in her roles as Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate and as Martha in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, for which she also won the a British Evening Standard Award.--Publisher description.


Stacy A. Cordery, Alice. Alice Roosevelt Longworth lived her entire life on the political stage and in the public eye, earning her the nickname "the other Washington monument." Historian Cordery presents a detailed and entertaining portrait of the witty and whip-smart daughter of Teddy Roosevelt. "Princess Alice" was a tempestuous teenager. Smoking, gambling, and dressing flamboyantly, she flouted social conventions and opened the door for other women to do the same. Her husband was Speaker of the House Nicholas Longworth but--as Cordery documents for the first time--she had a child with her lover, Senator William Borah of Idaho. Alice's political acumen was widely respected in Washington. She was a sharp-tongued critic of her cousin FDR's New Deal programs, and meetings in her drawing room helped to change the course of history, from undermining the League of Nations to boosting Nixon. During the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, her legendary salons remained the center of political ferment.--From publisher description.
Our libraries have many more biographies of both women and men, famous and infamous. Check out the catalog or stop by your local library to browse the biography section.

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